8218 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 415
Bethesda, MD 20814
(301) 656-1588

Digital Radiographs

Dental professionals use digital radiographs to detect, diagnose, treat, and monitor oral conditions and diseases.

Digital radiography is a type of x-ray imaging using digital sensors, replacing traditional photographic film and produces enhanced computer images of; teeth, gums, and other oral structures and conditions of a Patient's mouth.

Digital dental images are acquired three ways: the direct method, indirect method and semi-indirect method. The direct method uses an electronic sensor placed in the mouth to record images. The indirect technique uses an x-ray film scanner to view traditional dental x-rays as digital images. The semi-indirect digital technique combines both a sensor and a scanner to convert dental x-rays into digital imaging.

Women: Always tell your Doctor if there is any possibility that you are pregnant or are currently nursing. Remove jewelry, eye glasses and metal objects that might interfere with the x-ray imaging.


DexisIntraOralCamera-DEXcam3-2-02_large
Malcomson Dentistry Carivu

Digital Intra-Oral Camera and Cari-Vu Transilluminator

The ability to see subtleties using digital radiography is crucial to diagnosis, collaboration, and Patient communication. Using an Intra-Oral Camera and Transilluminator combine advanced technologies to deliver clinically meaningful images that are extremely clear and highly detailed. Fancy words, but a simple concept: patients benefit from a reduction in the number of exposure-related dental radiograph retakes.

When a suspicious area is identified on a radiograph, a transilluminated image can reveal the extent of the damage and help to confidently determine treatment. Transillumination can show lesions in the beginning stages, using CariVu during routine prophylaxis can aid the hygienist in identifying questionable areas early on and decide on a course of preventive care. When used together; a radiograph, a transilluminated image and an intra-oral photo can provide a comprehensive picture of the health of a tooth. When a suspicious area is identified on a radiograph, a transilluminated image can reveal the extent of the damage and help to confidently determine treatment.

Transillumination can show lesions in the beginning stages, using CariVu during routine prophylaxis can aid the hygienist in identifying questionable areas early on and decide on a course of preventive care. When used together; a radiograph, a transilluminated image and an intra-oral photo can provide a comprehensive picture of the health of a tooth.


Xray

Bitewing Radiographs (BWX)

Bitewings (BWX) are the most common of dental x-rays, showing the upper and lower back teeth above the gumline and the height of the bone between the teeth. BWX help diagnose gum disease and cavities between teeth. Normally, BWX are taken once per year and more frequently for Patients who have frequent cavities and less often for those with good oral hygiene and no cavities. Dr. Malcomson evaluates the necessity on a per Patient basis.


periapical

Periapical (PA)

A Periapical image is a single x-ray that is taken to show a specific area that may be causing pain or sensitivity to the Patient. Periapical radiography is a commonly used intraoral imaging technique in radiology and may be a component of your radiologic examination. A Periapical radiograph provides important information about the tooth and surrounding bone.


Full Mouth Series (FMX)

A “full-set” of Periapical x-rays show all of your teeth, surrounding bone and helps to diagnose cavities, cysts or tumors, abscesses, impacted teeth and gum disease. Consisting of 14-20 individual x-rays, a FMX is typically recommended during one of your first visits with a new Dentist to aid in proper diagnosis and treatment planning.

fmx


Panoramic (PAN)

A panoramic dental x-ray uses a small dose of ionizing radiation to capture the entire mouth in one image. It is commonly performed by dentists and oral surgeons in everyday practice and may be used to plan treatment for dentures, braces, extractions and implants. This exam requires little to no special preparation. Panoramic radiography, also called panoramic x-ray, is a two-dimensional (2-D) dental x-ray examination that captures the entire mouth in a single image, including the teeth, upper and lower jaws, surrounding structures and tissues.

The jaw is a curved structure similar to that of a horseshoe. However, the panoramic x-ray produces a flat image of the curved structure. It usually provides details of the bones and teeth. An x-ray (radiograph) is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. Imaging with x-rays involves exposing a part of the body to a small dose of ionizing radiation to produce pictures of the inside of the body. X-rays are the oldest and most frequently used form of medical imaging. Unlike a traditional intraoral x-ray where the film/x-ray detector is placed inside of the mouth, the film for a panoramic x-ray is contained inside of the machine.

malcomson-dentistry-panograph

What are some common uses of a Panoramic x-ray?
A panoramic x-ray is a commonly performed examination by dentists and oral surgeons in everyday practice and is an important diagnostic tool. It covers a wider area than a conventional intraoral x-ray and, as a result, provides valuable information about the maxillary sinuses, tooth positioning and other bone abnormalities. This examination is also used to plan treatment for full and partial dentures, braces, extractions and implants. A panoramic x-ray can also reveal dental and medical problems such as: advanced periodontal disease, cysts in the jaw bones, jaw tumors and oral cancer, impacted teeth including wisdom teeth, jaw disorders (also known as temporomandibular joint or TMJ disorders) and sinusitis.

Translate »